Body image in anorexia recovery

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Wednesday, 15 May 2019

Body image in anorexia recovery

Laura shares her experiences of overcoming negative body image whilst recovering from an eating disorder.
“A body does not have to be a prison. Instead, our bodies can be precious vehicles for life.” – Jenni Schaefer
Recovering from an eating disorder has also meant attempting to rebuild a positive body image. My focus has been forced to shift from hating and starving my body to nourishing it with the food it deserves. It’s changed from cursing my arms and legs and stomach for being too ‘big’, to allowing my body to regain the weight it desperately needed to.
It hasn’t been easy, and I’m not there yet. I have never felt comfortable in my skin. I always, and wrongly, believed that if I was thin, I wouldn’t have a problem. I equated thinness to happiness, and I thought if I achieved what I perceived as a perfect body, I would also achieve a perfect life.
But when I fell victim to anorexia, for reasons far more complex than simply what I looked like, I realised I had been wrong. The voice in my head was never pleased, no matter how much weight I lost. I had to be thinner. If I wanted to feel better in my body, I’d just have to lose more.
It’s only now that I can see how wrong this voice was, and how disordered its logic. It’s only now, with hindsight, that I can see that at my thinnest, I was also the loneliest, saddest and emptiest version of myself. At my thinnest, I hated my body more than ever.
Over time, I’ve learnt that my body image is dependent on how I feel inside. On a good day, I can breeze through without a thought to my weight or shape; on a bad day, when I feel anxious or sad or stressed, I am painfully aware of the size of my body and the space I take up. On those days, I want to starve and shrink my body more than ever before. Perhaps I think if I am smaller physically, my feelings will be smaller too, or maybe I just want to disappear completely. Who knows the rationale behind an eating disorder? All I can do is tell myself it is wrong.
The thing is, we are all so much more than our bodies. We are the sum of the friendships and relationships we invest in, the hobbies we love to pursue and the talents and strengths we possess. As it turns out, your body image is just a reflection on how you feel about yourself. If you dislike who you are, you’ll dislike how you look, regardless of your weight or shape. I am learning to appreciate my body for what it can do instead of how it looks. Shifting our focus from the size of our thighs to the contents of our hearts can transform the way we see our bodies for the better.
Positive body image comes from the inside: nourish yourself, respect yourself, and slowly you can grow to love yourself.
My name's Laura and I'm currently studying for a Master's degree in journalism. I'm really passionate about improving student mental health having been unwell for a lot of my degree, and I'm one of the editors here at the Student Minds blog. I believe sharing our stories is one of the most powerful things we can do! Posted by Student Minds Blogging Editorial Team at 17:17 Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest Labels: Body Image, Eating Disorders, Recovery

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Universities need to do more to promote positive body image

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Monday, 13 May 2019

Universities need to do more to promote positive body image

Lorna shares her experience of body image at university and calls for universities to do more to promote body positivity. – Lorna
University can be a really scary time. You leave all you have ever known and trek halfway across the country to live with strangers and work harder than you ever have before.
It’s not surprising therefore it’s a particularly risky time for the development of mental health disorders. Whilst universities are becoming increasingly sensitive to the need to reduce stress and support those facing depression and anxiety, I feel they continue to fail in regards to promoting positive body image.
I went to a particularly sporty university in the South West. Millions was spent on campus gym facilities, and the university prided itself on pumping out a significant number of Olympic athletes. This was great, as it brought huge funding to campus, and there was always a sense of pride when one of our own did well in national and international competitions.
A side effect of this focus on sport however was what I considered an institutionally warped sense of body image. All promotional images for campus contained individuals who looked like they had walked off the cover of a fitness magazine. I rarely saw people across campus who weren’t in sporting gear – at times it felt like skin tight leggings and running tops were some form of uniform!
Every single food outlet on campus served some sort of protein fuelled food, including shakes, bakes and meals. All menus contained calorific content, and some café’s even added protein to hot drinks at your request!
It was standard for people to spend long periods of time in the gym, pushing themselves way beyond any norms, and no one batted an eyelid. I know loads of people who continued to work out when injured, desperate to push themselves and maintain their place on their sporting team of choice. The gym staff never questioned anyone on their extreme workout habits, and were not trained in spotting the signs of dysmorphic or eating disordered behaviour – to the contrary, I feel they often promoted it.
To me, it came as no surprise to hear eating disorder rates at this university are extremely high, according to a recent survey. I too developed anorexia whilst studying here, having been left feeling inadequate whilst walking across campus alongside in what felt like a sea of models. I had never wanted to join a gym, but during my time at university not only did I join one, I became obsessed; going often and pushing myself even when exhausted.
I feel universities could do so much more to promote body positivity or a less dysmorphic way of thinking about body image. From educating students of the dangers of excessive exercise to helping gym staff spot the signs of disordered behaviours. They should be always willing to put the wellbeing and safety of their students above their sporting accomplishments.

I'm Lorna, a psychology graduate from the University of Bath. I love spending time with my two dogs, Poppy and Pippa! I'm passionate about challenging mental health stigma, particularly relating to Eating Disorders and Personality Disorders. Posted by Student Minds Blogging Editorial Team at 11:14 Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest Labels: Active Mental Health, Eating Disorders

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10 ways to be body-kind

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Monday, 13 May 2019

10 ways to be body-kind

Caitlin shares her top 10 tips to be more body kind and how we should start being nicer to ourselves and our bodies. – Caitlin
For a lot of us – myself included – the way we perceive our bodies can often be distorted, and the things we say about our appearances can unfortunately be very unkind sometimes. We really can be our own worst enemies, but it is possible change this! It’s time we all started being nicer to ourselves and our bodies. Of course it’s not an easy job or an overnight success, so to help you, here are some little tips you can use which will hopefully encourage you to view your body in a more positive light and appreciate it for how beautiful and wonderful it really is.
1. Appreciate how your body works
Our bodies really are miracle-workers. Just think of all the tasks and functions they perform every single day without us even having to worry – it’s incredible! We should be thanking our bodies for looking after us, and in turn, look after them. I think it’s also important to appreciate what our bodies can do and not what they can’t do.
2. Treat your body
When I think of ‘treat’, the image of eating chocolate brownies and watching TV springs to mind. For others, it might be cooking up a new recipe, having a duvet-day or going out for a run. Whatever it is that makes you feel good – go ahead and do it! You deserve to feel happy and your body will love you for it.
3. Use social media to your advantage
We all know the internet can be both a blessing and a curse when it comes to body image. So, my tip is to ask yourself whilst you’re scrolling through social media: “is this making me unhappy?”. If the answer is ‘yes’, stop. Make sure you’re having a good time! Try following body-positive blogs like nonairbrushedme, bbcbodypositive and i_weigh.
4. Talk to people
Talking about body image can be quite daunting but it’s definitely worth it. Whether you’re sharing feelings about your own body with a friend or seeking advice from a GP or university support system, it’s good to start a conversation. You’ll not only be helping yourself but you may inspire someone else to be kinder to their body or even get help.
5. Set positive goals
Setting goals and targets is something we all do, and many of these may be body-related. The best kind of goals are the ones which aren’t based on restrictions and instead focus on things you can improve on rather than omit. A challenge can be great, but keep in mind that both your mental and physical wellness is your priority.
6. Understand that your mind and body are linked
I believe that the key to happiness is knowing that a healthy mind is a healthy body, and a healthy body is a healthy mind. They work together. Getting enough sleep, nutrition and exercise will make you feel happier, and if you feel good in yourself mentally, you’ll feel physically better too. As they say, it’s all about a healthy balance.
7. Celebrate your uniqueness
Your uniqueness is what make you special, and body diversity allows us to celebrate our individual differences. Comparing our “weird and wonderful” bodies with others can be fun and interesting but it should never be a negative thing or feel like a competition. Be confident and happy in yourself exactly as you are. The things that make you you are beautiful.
8. Take those compliments!
It’s easy to brush off or reject a compliment, especially if it’s about your body image. Though it may feel strange at first, actively try to respond positively and accept the compliment – and believe it too! Teaching yourself to do this is a great way to be body-kind and makes both the giver and the receiver of the compliment feel good.
9. Accept that your body changes
As we grow and develop, our bodies naturally change in terms of how they look and how they work. This is just part of life, and accepting that your body is different now to how it was ten years ago or even ten months ago can help you see yourself in a more positive light. In essence, don’t compare yourself to yourself!
10. Know that beauty is subjective
I strongly believe that we shouldn’t set our appearances against a certain standard of beauty because there isn’t one. It simply doesn’t exist. There is no one way we should look, no one way we should dress and no one way we should define ourselves. Create your own beauty and allow yourself to find happiness and strength within that beauty.
And there you have it – 10 ways to be body-kind. It might take time, but I hope these little tips help you feel positive about your body, as you deserve to.

Hello! I’m Caitlin and I’m a student at The University of York. I’m writing for Student Minds with the aim of encouraging people to be kinder to their bodies as well as their minds – and to have fun whilst doing it!
Posted by Student Minds Blogging Editorial Team at 10:31 Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest Labels: Eating Disorders, Looking after yourself

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I Believe It’s Possible to Fully Recover from an Eating Disorder

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When I first started struggling with food and body image at eight years old, I was convinced it would be a lifelong struggle. My days were spent getting on and off a scale more times than anyone could imagine and counting out my cornflakes before I’d even think of eating them. I felt that I was destined to be bound by my eating disorder forever.

However, at 22 years old, I am fully recovered from anorexia. There is some controversy in the mental health world about whether full recovery from an eating disorder is possible, and I wholeheartedly believe it is (in fact, I’m living proof). Eating disorder expert Carolyn Costin says,

Being recovered to me is when the person can accept his or her natural body size and shape and no longer has a self-destructive or unnatural relationship with food or exercise. When you are recovered, food and weight take a proper perspective in your life and what you weigh is not more important than who you are; in fact, actual numbers are of little or no importance at all. When recovered, you will not compromise your health or betray your soul to look a certain way, wear a certain size or reach a certain number on a scale. When recovered, you do not use eating disorder behaviors to deal with, distract from, or cope with other problems.

My eating disorder truly is a thing of the past. While I still struggle with major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and PTSD, and my battle with anorexia has certainly informed the woman I’ve become, I no longer experience eating disorder thoughts or even the slightest urge to use eating disorder behavior. I’ve learned that my life will never be perfect, and I’ve gained the ability to cope effectively, even in extremely difficult circumstances.

Mental health advocacy has been one of the biggest catalysts in my recovery. Through discovering mental health advocacy, I’ve had the opportunity to be a part of something so much bigger than myself. I’ve found an immense sense of purpose, and I’ve connected with countless individuals who have also found true full recovery from their eating disorders. My commitment to this advocacy, coupled with my dedication to my professional treatment and my determination to find a life beyond my eating disorder truly led me to full recovery.

Long gone are the days of 10-year-old Colleen measuring her Rice Krispies, 16-year-old Colleen compulsively exercising after hours of dance rehearsals, and 19-year-old Colleen relapsing after seeing the number on the scale change. Now my days are filled with truly experiencing all emotions, appreciating my body regardless of any numbers, eating the foods my body, mind, and taste buds want, and pursuing my dream of becoming an eating disorder therapist.

While I can’t promise you will find full recovery, I can tell you that it is possible. I encourage you to seek professional treatment and start your own advocacy journey, whether it be through volunteering for organizations like Project HEAL, Mental Health America, and NEDA, or through getting more vulnerable about your struggles on social media—it might just change your life

Mental Health America

This post courtesy of Mental Health America.

I Believe It’s Possible to Fully Recover from an Eating Disorder

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Body Dysmorphic Disorder’s Impact on Kids Today

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The teenage years are hard on kids’ sense of identity and self-esteem, especially as their bodies and minds are changing and growing at a rapid rate. As a parent, it may feel like you are jumping through mental and emotional hoops, doing your best to build up your child while still maintaining discipline. However, adolescents who struggle with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) may need more help than most parents may realize.

Body Dysmorphic Disorder Strikes at a Vulnerable Age

Body dysmorphic disorder is a mental disorder that leads individuals to constantly think about their perceived appearance flaws. These flaws may be small and therefore unobservable by others, but for someone with BDD, those perceived defects in their appearance can be all-consuming.

According to research, this disorder often strikes sometime during either childhood or the later adolescent years, with 16 being the average age of those diagnosed. Since teens are often going through many difficult changes during this time period, their BDD may go unnoticed by parents or simply seen as an extension of teenage angst. However, a child’s body dysmorphia and overall obsessive unhappiness with their appearance may not be their only mental health issue.

Comorbid Disorders Often Impact Teens with BDD

The same research that pointed out that adolescence is usually when body dysmorphic disorder begins also stressed that children struggling with this issue often had other comorbid mental health problems. As BDD is considered part of the obsessive-compulsive family of disorders, it is not surprising that anxiety is one of the common mental health issues present with BDD.

Depression is another major factor in those struggling with BDD, along with suicidal thoughts and attempts. Eating disorders were also found to be comorbid conditions in adolescents with body dysmorphic disorder.

In fact, a case report concerning a teen with severe body dysmorphic disorder also had several severe comorbid mental health disorders, regularly suffering from depression, delusions, and suicidal ideation. The professionals who wrote up her case suggested that BDD is underdiagnosed by professionals who focus on treating the co-morbid issues without directly addressing the body dysmorphia.

Signs Your Child May Have Body Dysmorphic Disorder

Now that you understand the impact body dysmorphic disorder can have on your kids, it is also important that you are able to recognize the signs of BDD. Commonly, those with BDD have an unhappy obsession with one or more of their body parts, such as:

  • Facial feature, i.e., acne, nose size, complexion, etc.
  • Skin and veins
  • Hair appearance
  • Genitalia
  • Breasts
  • Overall musculature

These signs can manifest in a number of symptoms. Some of the symptoms of BDD you may see in your son or daughter are:

  • Constantly preoccupied with a flaw in their features, which you may or may not see. Even if you do see a minor flaw, your teen perceives it as far worse.
  • Believe that their perceived flaw makes them hideous or visibly deformed.
  • Withdrawal from social situations and functions to keep people from seeing the flaws.
  • Spending an inordinate amount of time styling hair, makeup, or clothes to help disguise perceived flaws.
  • Believing that people are constantly noticing their flaws and are making fun of them.
  • Perpetually seeks yours and others reassurance about their appearance.

Ways Parents Can Help Kids Struggling with Body Dysmorphic Disorder

While body dysmorphic disorder can have a serious impact on your teen, you have the ability to help them overcome their disordered thinking. Some of the best things you can do are:

Be available to talk

Your support and insight can make a world of difference to your child. Even though teens may sometimes act like they never want to talk to you, knowing that you are there and willing to listen when your child needs it can help them feel heard and less isolated with their obsessions and anxiety.

Access professional help

In many cases of BDD, children need the help of professionals to assist in overcoming their obsessive thoughts. Should your child have depression or other comorbid conditions with their disordered thinking, a residential treatment center could be a nurturing environment staffed with the professionals your child needs.

Provide accurate health information

Weight and body composition unhappiness is a significant feature for those who struggle with BDD. This unhappiness may lead them to make poor health choices such as severely restricting their food intake.

Instead of allowing this behavior, you can provide them with accurate health information, whether it is the nutritional value of food or the best workouts to help them become more fit. The natural reward hormones released by exercise can also be beneficial in altering your child’s mindset.

Model healthy behaviors

Parental behaviors can play a profound part in a child’s self-perceptions, so it is essential that parents model healthy behaviors.

It can be tempting to make off-hand, critical remarks about your body, but while you may not mean them to a severe extent, it is easy for a young child or teen hear you and follow your example to a more extreme conclusion.

When it comes to body dysmorphic disorder, the sooner your son or daughter receives treatment, the higher the probability that BDD will have a less severe impact on them. So, if your teen has been complaining about their appearance, be sure to listen to see if there is an obviously obsessive and false component to what they are saying and be ready to get them the help they need.

References

Jacobson, Tyler. (2019). 6 Mental & Emotional Flaming Hoops You Jump Through for Your Kids. Retrieved https://psychcentral.com/blog/6-mental-emotional-flaming-hoops-you-jump-through-for-your-kids/

Bjornsson, A. S., Didie, E. R., Grant, J. E., Menard, W., Stalker, E., & Phillips, K. A. (2013). Age at onset and clinical correlates in body dysmorphic disorder. Comprehensive psychiatry, 54(7), 893–903. doi:10.1016/j.comppsych.2013.03.019

Thungana, Y., Moxley, K., & Lachman, A. (2018). Body dysmorphic disorder: A diagnostic challenge in adolescence. South African Journal of Psychiatry, 24, 4 pages. doi: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajpsychiatry.v24i0.1114

Jacobson, Tyler. (2019). How Parents Can Model Healthy Behavior for Their Kids & Teens. Retrieved https://psychcentral.com/blog/how-parents-can-model-healthy-behavior-for-their-kids-teens/

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Living with Chronic Anorexia 

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It’s been two-thirds of my life that I have been listening to this harassment in my head. I’ve talked back, I’ve fought back, I’ve negotiated, and yet I still suffer. It’s like a permanently playing radio, sometimes louder, sometimes more quiet, but always there as the background sound of my life. It is exhausting, but not as exhausting as it is to try to turn it off and keep it off. Sadly, I’m just used to it now. It’s become so normalized that I don’t really recall what it’s like to not have it there, my chronic and badgering anorexia.

I know that it’s in my genes because I have relatives who, although never diagnosed, have struggled with eating issues as long as I can remember.

Many people know about my disease, yet many do not. I don’t know what they think about me. I am a master of making excuses for missing meals, and people don’t realize that my obsession with exercise is not something to be admired.

Since the very first signs of an eating disorder, my parents had me in therapy. I’ve devoted my life to animals, but so much time and effort has been consumed with therapy, doctors, dietitians, medication, inpatient treatment and hospitalizations. Nobody can cure me — or anybody — of this. But people can get better. Or not. Chronic anorexia (also known as Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa) feels like handcuffs and, sadly, like something I will always live with.

My mind started the anorexia harassment when most people are starting puberty. It stunted my growth and stole away my adolescence, causing lifelong and terrifying damage to myself. That’s what people don’t realize — I’m not naturally this small; I have forced myself to maintain this body since I was a child. And it didn’t help that I was a pretty serious gymnast. But this body isn’t who I was meant to be. Who knows who I was meant to be.

So I go about my life, missing out on so many foods that I know I would love but aren’t worth the anguish of listening to that damn voice in my head. I’m somehow different. I can’t have them. I don’t know what it’s like to eat what I want, when I want. Anything outside of my “safe foods” makes me feel like I’m gaining weight and like I’m bad, for I have disobeyed my eating disorder. Challenging it is simply too exhausting. And I punish myself with exercise, no matter the weather, no matter the pain. It’s the only thing that quiets and calms me.

I am constantly shocked how people can be so incredibly stupid, especially when they think they are trying to help me. The comments they have made send me backwards and out of control, back into the comforting arms of anorexia. “You look healthy.” “You look great.” “You look like you put some meat on your bones.” I’m thirty pounds underweight. Who on earth would think these are helpful things to say? I don’t want to look “healthy,” and saying so to an anorexic person thinking it will make me feel better can be damaging. Healthy means fat to me, great means that clearly thirty pounds underweight isn’t enough. And yet other people make very concerned comments to my mom, as if she hasn’t been spending years trying to help me get better.

You don’t know what somebody else is going through. Be careful what you say. I’d like to be more open with people, but I fear that they will think I’m judging their diet, their weight. I’m not, I don’t. It’s only me who sees myself and hears myself the way I do. And if you are familiar with these same harassing voices, like a conscience gone awry, seek help. At least there’s more knowledge of the causes (biological, genetics) and so maybe some better treatment options than when I fell into this trap about 23 years ago.

So now all I can do is persist in life, doing the very best I can to give back to the world despite the buzzing radio static of anorexia nervosa. I have hope, but there is no cure yet.

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Finding Your Yes: A Powerful Strategy for Shifting from Negative Habits to Positive Ones

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Try this short experiment and say the following statements to yourself: I want to stop eating junk food. I want to stop yelling at my kids. I want to stop worrying about things I can’t control. (Feel free to substitute behaviors that might be more relevant in your life).

Notice how this feels in your body when you say these things to yourself. Do you feel tight and constricted or more open and expansive? Do you feel motivated and energized to change these habits, or do you tend to feel stuck, closed off, or perhaps even some sense of guilt or shame?

Now try these statements out (and again feel free to change them to fit the behaviors that are relevant in your life): I want to commit to making food choices that support and nourish radiant health and wholeness. I want to parent my kids so that they feel deeply supported and valued; I want to fully engage in as many precious, present moments of my life as possible. Notice how this feels in your body as you say these things, and ask yourself the same questions as above.

Chances are, these first and second statements have a different feeling tone for you.

To simplify this experiment even further, you might say the word “no” out loud several times and notice what happens in your body. Now say the word “yes” several times. For most people, the first has a feeling of resisting or rejecting something, and it feels constricted and closed, whereas the second has a feeling of embracing or moving toward something that is more energizing, open and hopeful.

Focusing on the “Yes”

According to the work of researcher and health psychologist Kelly McGonigal, focusing on what you can say “yes” to, choosing a value-based commitment that reflects something important to you in your life, and taking a positive action toward something, are more effective ways to change behavior than trying to say no to something or trying to stop engaging in a behavior you are unhappy with. In other words, committing to what you want is more powerful than trying to resist something that you don’t want.

As simple as this shift may sound, it is a new idea for many people, especially when it comes to wanting to change difficult behaviors. It is human nature to want to resist, push away, and fight against what is unpleasant or undesirable. In addition, it is common to be self-critical and to beat ourselves up when we aren’t able to stop engaging in an unhelpful behavior. We sometimes think that if we are hard on ourselves this will help us stick to our goals. According to researcher Dr. Kristen Neff, the research is quite compelling to support the power of self-compassion over self-criticism, as a vehicle for behavior change.

I know for me, during my teen years and into my early college years, I struggled with a very unhealthy relationship to food and a negative body image. I would binge eat, and then try to punish myself by restricting my eating. I would berate myself and feel shame when I couldn’t stick to my goals of eliminating junk food and losing weight. Then one day, I read a book that completely shifted my focus and how I was approaching my goals. It was a book about the benefits of aerobic exercise and it sparked my interest in becoming healthier and stronger by adding a positive behavior instead of trying to eliminate a negative one.

As I moved toward incorporating this new behavior (exercise) into my life, my struggle with food began to fall away. I was no longer battling myself and focusing on constantly saying “no” throughout my day; instead, I was saying “yes” to something that I found meaningful and that I enjoyed. When I look back at other big changes in my life, they too involved saying “yes” to something rather than saying “no” and trying to stop myself from doing something (which often didn’t work).

Finding Your YES

So I invite you to ask yourself what you might say YES to in your life today. Instead of trying to stop something that isn’t working, what might you add into your life that encompasses a value that is deeply important to you? For example, instead of trying to stop binge watching TV or playing on your phone at night, you might focus instead on adding in 30 minutes of quality time with your children or partner or friends each night, and notice how that shifts your experience with TV.

Here are a few questions that you can ask yourself to get started:

  1. What do you want to say yes to, go after, create or cultivate in your life?
  2. What is your WHY? Why is this important to you? How does it connect to your deepest values about how you want to live your life?
  3. What can you do today, and what small, specific and committed actions can you take each day that are consistent with your long-term values (from question 2).
  4. How might your inner dialogue (that voice in your head and the things you say to yourself all day long) support your long-term goals and be self-compassionate when you are struggling? In other words, imagine what you would say to a good friend who was trying to say “yes” to something in their life and at times experiencing setbacks, that would be supportive and encouraging. Try to speak to yourself that way.

Finding Your Yes: A Powerful Strategy for Shifting from Negative Habits to Positive Ones

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