This Is When You Think You’re Crazy…

This is an interesting article I found on: www.goodtherapy.org

See credits below.


(The following is an excerpt from Sarah Swenson’s upcoming book, COACHING SUPPORT FOR NEURODIVERSE COUPLES.)

You have learned how to phrase things in such a way that you are least likely to get blamed or criticized. You have learned to distinguish with fine skills the difference between when it’s okay to speak and when it’s better to wait until another time.

You also know when the only thing you can do is keep your mouth closed. Sometimes, when you do that, tears burn down your cheek.

That’s when you hear, “What’s the matter now?”

And what do you actually hear? You hear the word now. That’s all.

Because, once again, your partner has read your facial expression, come to a conclusion, and judged you incorrectly. Judged you and condemned you with that critical tone and that final word now, as if your emotional life were a continuous saga of assaults against them.

This is when you feel crazy.

You feel crazy, because you know there is no satisfactory answer to this question. If you venture forth into describing your hesitation to bring up a topic, you risk being told you’re being ridiculous. If you actually make an effort to explain the thoughts or feelings you initially resisted sharing and which brought on the tears in the first place, your partner’s critical reaction tells you immediately that you were being smarter when you decided, in the beginning, to keep them to yourself. By giving them voice, you have created precisely the situation you feared: your partner not only doesn’t understand what you are talking about, but also dismisses your feelings, and on top of that, is angered or dismayed by the fact that you had to cry in order to get their attention—which was a pretty pathetic cry for attention at that.

Yes, this is when you feel crazy.

You are caught in a double bind.

You can speak your mind, and you will be judged or criticized.

You can remain quiet, and you will be judged or criticized.

You cannot win.

You’re probably not even sure what normal looks like anymore. You think it may have something to do with getting what you want.

I’d like to suggest that there’s more to it than that.

It has more to do with getting what you need.

Please believe that you are not asking for the moon or the stars when you are asking your partner to listen to you. Please believe that you have the right to ask for this. Please believe that you are hurting yourself by thinking you should expect anything less.Within an intimate relationship, by virtue of the agreement into which you both freely entered, you have a right to expect that your partner will respect you enough to listen to you, to hear you, and to care enough to have your back. To respond to your emotions. To listen to your concerns. To discuss things that are on your mind.

These are not just things you want.

These are essential components of your mental health.

When they are missing in a relationship, and especially when they are replaced with blaming, judgment, or criticism—when you get the message that you don’t even have a right to have such an opinion or that you are out of your mind to think such a thing—those are the times of the deepest pain. Those are the moments of the greatest loneliness. Those are the times when your self-esteem is at its greatest risk for erosion.

Please believe that you are not asking for the moon or the stars when you are asking your partner to listen to you. Please believe that you have the right to ask for this. Please believe that you are hurting yourself by thinking you should expect anything less.

You are not crazy to expect your partner to respect and love you. That’s what you were promised when you entered into this relationship.

It is still valid to believe.

If your partner is not holding up their side of the agreement, that is not a reflection of your self-worth. It is a reflection of their inability or unwillingness to give the person who loves them what they need.

Changes are possible to the extent that your partner is willing and able to enter into conversation that cuts to the root of your not being heard. This may require the help of a counselor. If you are fortunate, your partner will agree to take the steps toward healing.

I leave you with one more thought: you are not crazy. In fact, you’d be crazy to believe you deserved anything less than respect and love from your partner. Unfortunately, emotionally unavailable individuals often convince their partners that they deserve exactly what they get: nothing.

© Copyright 2019 GoodTherapy.org. All rights reserved.

The preceding article was solely written by the author named above. Any views and opinions expressed are not necessarily shared by GoodTherapy.org. Questions or concerns about the preceding article can be directed to the author or posted as a comment below.

Original Article

Hope you enjoyed reading this article.
Please feel free to share!

addiction-counsellor-gareth-parry-hebdencounselling.co.uk

Avoidant Personality and Social Anxiety: What’s the Difference?

This is an interesting article I found on: www.goodtherapy.org

See credits below.


The silhouette of a person standing in a field of yellow mustard flowers.Social anxiety and avoidant personality disorder share some common features, but they are separate mental health conditions. Because the two conditions appear similar in many ways, it’s not uncommon for people to mistake one for the other.

Sometimes simply getting help is more important than having a specific diagnosis. But some people also find it beneficial to know what’s affecting them. In some cases, the best approach to treatment differs for separate mental health issues, so misdiagnosis can affect treatment and make it harder for a person to improve.

Social anxiety, or social phobia, is a specific type of anxiety characterized by a fear of social situations. People with social anxiety worry about embarrassing themselves in public or doing something that will cause others to judge them negatively. It’s fairly common for people to feel nervous about doing something embarrassing in public, but the feelings of fear and anxiety that occur with social phobia can become so distressing they cause difficulty at work, school, or other parts of daily life. About 75% of people with social anxiety are between the ages of 8 and 15 when diagnosed.

Avoidant personality disorder is a cluster C personality disorder. Personality disorders are a specific kind of mental health issue where patterns of thought and behavior affect daily life, and those with personality disorders often experience difficulty in professional and personal life because they have a hard time understanding other people and common situations.

Levana Slabodnick, LISW-S, a therapist in Columbus, Ohio, notices one difference between social anxiety and avoidant personality may lie in how a person views their own experience. She explains, “A fundamental difference between social anxiety disorder and avoidant personality disorder relates to how the sufferer perceives their own pain. Those with anxiety understand on a basic level that their anxiety is irrational and that the world doesn’t judge them as harshly as they judge themselves. Those with APD, on the other hand, lack this insight. They hold deep rooted feelings of insecurity and worthlessness that they believe to be factual.”

People with avoidant personality often feel socially awkward and inferior to others. They tend to be very sensitive to criticism and rejection and often avoid making friends or participating in social events unless they are sure of their welcome. Feelings of shame or self-loathing are more strongly associated with avoidant personality than social anxiety. This condition is not often diagnosed in children, though it often develops in childhood.

Avoidant Personality Disorder vs. Social Anxiety

Social anxiety and avoidant personality share an intense fear of being embarrassed or judged in social situations. People might describe a person with either condition as shy, timid, awkward, or fearful.

Fear associated with these conditions can present in many ways, such as:

  • Avoiding social situations
  • Avoiding interactions with strangers
  • Low self-esteem
  • Shyness or timidity around other people
  • Isolation from others or complete social withdrawal

Debate over whether avoidant personality is a more severe type of social anxiety exists among mental health experts. According to the fifth edition of the DSM, these issues are often diagnosed together and can overlap to the point where they might seem like different presentations of the same concern. But while avoidant personality typically involves patterns of avoidance in most or all areas of life, social anxiety may only involve avoidance in a few specific situations. The DSM continues to categorize them separately.

Debate over whether avoidant personality is a more severe type of social anxiety exists among mental health experts.

The two issues continue to share similarities when it comes to risk factors. Genetic and environmental factors can contribute to the development of either condition. Avoidance can be a learned response. People might begin to avoid social situations after a negative experience, for example. Being shy as a child can also increase the likelihood a person will go on to develop social anxiety or avoidant personality, though being shy does not necessarily mean a person will develop either issue for certain.

Experiencing abuse, trauma, bullying, or other negative events in childhood can increase risk for both social anxiety and avoidant personality. But neglect, particularly physical neglect, is a significant risk factor for avoidant personality. A 2015 study comparing the two conditions found that having disinterested caregivers, feeling rejected by caregivers, or not having enough affection in childhood was more common in people with avoidant personality.

Certain risk factors do differ between the two conditions:

  • Some research has suggested avoidant personality may be more likely when someone’s physical appearance changes after illness.
  • Research suggests brain structure may contribute to anxiety. If your amygdala, which is believed to help regulate your response to fear, is very active, you may experience greater anxiety in certain situations than other people do.
  • Having a parent or sibling with social anxiety makes it 2-6 times more likely a person will develop the condition, according to the DSM-5.

Should I Get Treatment for Social Anxiety or APD?

Therapy is generally recommended for both avoidant personality and social anxiety. Only a mental health professional can diagnose mental health issues. If you think you might have symptoms of either avoidant personality or social anxiety, making an appointment with a qualified therapist or counselor can be a good place to start.

Letting any potential counselors know your particular symptoms and describing your specific experience can help them decide whether they’re qualified to help you. Not every therapist has experience treating every mental health condition, but an ethical therapist will always let you know if they think another therapist might be more helpful.

Social anxiety is often treated with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). This therapy helps you identify thoughts that cause distress and affect you negatively. Once you identify them, you learn how to change them. You can do CBT alone, but some people find group therapy helpful.

Exposure-based CBT is a specific approach to CBT where you slowly expose yourself to feared situations. This approach often involves skills practice or role-playing techniques, both of which can help people get more comfortable interacting with others in the safe space of therapy.

According to a 2015 study, performing random acts of kindness for others led to a decrease in symptoms of social anxiety in study participants after 4 weeks.

While therapy can have great benefit, sometimes social anxiety doesn’t improve right away. If you are working with a counselor and still experience significant difficulty in your daily life, a psychiatrist may recommend medication, such as:

Anxiety medication can help relieve some symptoms of social anxiety, but it’s a good idea to continue with therapy at the same time, as therapy helps you learn how to cope with what you’re experiencing. This can have a more lasting effect on your symptoms.

Many people believe personality disorders are not treatable, but this isn’t the case. They can be difficult to treat, especially if you’ve had symptoms for a long time. But therapy can still be very helpful. People with avoidant personality often seek treatment when they experience loneliness and distress as a result of being unable to participate in social events.

Research has shown people with avoidant personality may do better in therapy if they have the support of family members.

Any kind of talking therapy can be helpful for avoidant personality. CBT is commonly used to treat this condition, but other helpful approaches include family and group therapy. Research has shown people with avoidant personality may do better in therapy if they have the support of family members. Group therapy can help people learn how to develop relationship and communication skills in a safe space, and it’s often recommended for treating personality disorders.

There’s no specific medication used to treat avoidant personality. However, antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications may help relieve some severe symptoms.

Conclusion

Social anxiety and avoidant personality have some similarities, and some approaches to treatment may be similar. Regardless of which condition you have, therapy can help. It’s important to reach out for help if you’re struggling with social situations. When social anxiety or avoidant personality go untreated, complications like depression, isolation, and substance abuse can develop. Some people may experience significant loneliness and distress.

Talking to a therapist can help you get a diagnosis. But you’ll also begin to learn ways to cope with the feelings you experience and explore methods of overcoming these feelings. Therapy can help you become more used to the company of others. In time, you may find it easier to participate in social situations.

If you need help finding a counselor in your area, our therapist directory is a good place to start. Remember, you aren’t alone!

References:

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fifth edition. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association. 103-110.
  2. Anxiety disorders. (2017, December 15). Cleveland Clinic. Retrieved from https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/9536-anxiety-disorders
  3. Avoidant personality disorder. (2017, November 20). Cleveland Clinic. Retrieved from https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/9761-avoidant-personality-disorder
  4. Eikenaes, I., Egeland, J., Hummelen, B., & Wilberg, T. (2015, March 27). Avoidant personality disorder versus social phobia: The significance of childhood neglect. PLoS One, 10(5). doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0122846
  5. Kvarnstorm, E. (2016, April 6). Avoidant personality disorder goes beyond social anxiety. Bridges to Recovery. Retrieved from https://www.bridgestorecovery.com/blog/avoidant-personality-disorder-goes-beyond-social-anxiety
  6. Lampe, L. (2016). Avoidant personality disorder as a social anxiety phenotype: Risk factors, associations and treatment. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 29(1), 64-69. doi: 10.1097/YCO.0000000000000211
  7. Personality disorders. (2016, September 23). Mayo Clinic. Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/personality-disorders/symptoms-causes/syc-20354463
  8. Smith, K. (2018, November 19). Avoidant personality disorder. Retrieved from https://www.psycom.net/avoidant-personality-disorder
  9. Social anxiety disorder (social phobia). (2017, August 29). Mayo Clinic. Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/social-anxiety-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20353561
  10. Trew, J. L., & Alden, L. E. (2015, June 5). Kindness reduces avoidance goals in socially anxious people. Motivation and Emotion, 39(6), 892–907. Retrieved from https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11031-015-9499-5

© Copyright 2019 GoodTherapy.org. All rights reserved. Permission to publish granted by

The preceding article was solely written by the author named above. Any views and opinions expressed are not necessarily shared by GoodTherapy.org. Questions or concerns about the preceding article can be directed to the author or posted as a comment below.

Original Article

Hope you enjoyed reading this article.
Please feel free to share!

addiction-counsellor-gareth-parry-hebdencounselling.co.uk

Yes, It’s Okay If You Are Still a Virgin

This is an interesting article I found on: www.goodtherapy.org

See credits below.


Silhouette of a hand and rose before a sunset.Losing your virginity can be a rite of passage signaling a transition from childhood to adulthood. For some people, having sex for the first time is an act of committed love. For others, the loss of virginity is a path to greater sexual pleasure and personal fulfillment. In a sex-saturated culture in which everyone is expected to have and enjoy sex, virginity may be stigmatized—especially for adults.

Virginity is a cultural construct. It means different things in different societies, and its definition has shifted with time. Most studies and many people define loss of virginity as having penile-vaginal intercourse for the first time. Yet this is a heteronormative definition of sex that excludes many sex acts.

Virginity is not a medical term. You cannot tell if someone is a virgin by looking at their hymen, penis, or other genitalia. Since there are many definitions of sex, there is no single, clinical definition of a virgin. The very notion of virginity or virginity stigma depends on a social construct, not a biological one.

The Stigma of the V-Card

Virginity comes in many forms. Some virgins may be eager to have sex, but unable to find the right partner. Others may be comfortable waiting, while quietly worrying that their inexperience means something is wrong with them. Some people remain virgins because of a lack of interest in sex. Asexual and aromantic people may face both virginity stigma and sexual minority stigma.

Some examples of virginity stigma include:

  • The idea that everyone wants to lose their virginity, and that people who remain virgins remain so because they cannot find a partner.
  • Shame about remaining a virgin.
  • Viewing virgins as categorically different from non-virgins.
  • Using “virgin” as an insult or a way to bully someone.

Virginity stigma is often gendered. Traditional notions of masculinity demand boys and men be very sexually active. Men who are unable or unwilling to conform to this norm may feel ashamed and self-conscious. Some men may engage in aggressive sexual behavior in an attempt to get partners to have sex with them.

Women often face conflicting pressures around sex. Some religions prize virginity in women. Some cultures and families even demand virginity, using virginity pledges and virginity balls as a way to encourage girls and women to abstain from sex. Yet women may also feel pressure to hew to their romantic partner’s desires and face criticism for putting up boundaries. Women who are interested in sex may feel ashamed of their desires, while others may be pressured into sex before they are ready.

More People Are Making Their Sexual Debut as Adults

When you’re anxious about still being a virgin, it can feel like everyone else is having sex. Media depictions of rampant sexual activity don’t help. Yet research actually shows that more people are remaining virgins for longer.

The average age of loss of virginity is around 17 years old for both males and females. However, fewer high school students are having sex. In 2007, 47.8% of high schoolers had had sex. By 2017, the figure had dropped to 39.5%. Research published in 2005 found that, among adults age 25-44, 97% of men and 98% of women have had vaginal intercourse. Research published in 2013 found 1 to 2% of adults remain virgins into their forties.

Most people assume others are having more sex and are more sexually experienced than they are, which is usually not the case.Young people today have less sex than the youth of two previous generations. A 2017 study found that, on average, they have sex nine fewer times per year than young people did a generation ago. Today’s young people are also on track to have fewer sexual partners.

Rachel Keller, LCSW-C, CST, a Maryland therapist who helps individuals and couples with sex and intimacy concerns, says perceptions often do not match reality.

“Most people assume others are having more sex and are more sexually experienced than they are, which is usually not the case. Young men in particular tend to assume that everyone else has had sex but them. They feel ashamed and wonder how they can possibly tell a future partner that they are a virgin. Once they finally have the conversation, they realize it’s not nearly as big of a deal as they thought. Being confident in who you are, open-minded, and generous are more important in creating a positive sexual relationship than the amount of experience you have,” she explains.

Some people may feel so ashamed of their sexual inexperience that they lie about their sexual history. This can actually compound stigma by contributing to the illusion that people are having more sex than they actually are. Additionally, anxiety about sex can make a person’s loss of virginity stressful and less pleasurable than it might otherwise be.

When people feel ashamed of their perceived inexperience, they may feel uncomfortable communicating with partners about their sexual history, preferences, or needs. This can make sex less enjoyable.

How Therapy Can Help With Virginity Stigma

Virginity is not a psychological problem. There is no “normal” age at which to have sex or appropriate amount of sex to have. Yet misleading and conflicting social norms about sex can lead to a toxic stew of self-doubt, sexual shame, mistaken notions about sexuality, and relationship frustration.

Therapy can help people navigate these complex issues. A therapist can work with a person to identify and understand their own values and sexual goals. For example, a person raised in a family that demanded virginity might interrogate this norm, then decide whether they wish to embrace or reject it.

A couples counselor can help couples who struggle with virginity stigma. For example, a couple who waits until marriage to have sex may need support to talk about sex and feel comfortable losing their virginity. Or a couple in which only one partner is a virgin may need to master sexual communication to reduce shame around virginity.

Some other ways a therapist can help include:

  • Destigmatizing virginity with education and research about typical sexual behavior.
  • Discussing issues of sexual identity and orientation. Some people remain virgins because they are asexual or aromantic. Others worry they can’t be certain of their identity until they have sex.
  • Supporting a person to talk about sex with their partners and identify sexual acts with which they are comfortable.
  • Encouraging a client to draw their own sexual boundaries rather than relying on the sexual boundaries that friends, family, or society want them to draw.
  • Talking about issues of self-esteem, shame, and gender norms.

Therapy can play a key role in helping sexually inexperienced people prepare for a healthy sexual relationship. When a person does not want to have sex at all, therapy can support them in embracing that identity and pushing back against stigma.

You can find a therapist here.

References:

  1. FAQs and sex information. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://kinseyinstitute.org/research/faq.php
  2. Fewer U.S. high school students having sex, using drugs. (2018, June 14). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2018/p0614-yrbs.html
  3. Haydon, A. A., Cheng, M. M., Herring, A. H., McRee, A., & Halpern, C. T. (2013). Prevalence and predictors of sexual inexperience in adulthood. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 43(2), 221-230. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3947171
  4. No such thing as virginity, author says. (2010, August 3). Retrieved from https://www.today.com/popculture/no-such-thing-virginity-author-says-wbna30353377
  5. Twenge, J. M., Sherman, R. A., & Wells, B. E. (2017). Declines in sexual frequency among American adults, 1989-2014. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 46(8), 2389-2401. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28265779
  6. Virginity and the hymen myth. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.justthefacts.co.nz/about-your-sexual-body/about-virginity-hymen-myths

© Copyright 2019 GoodTherapy.org. All rights reserved.

The preceding article was solely written by the author named above. Any views and opinions expressed are not necessarily shared by GoodTherapy.org. Questions or concerns about the preceding article can be directed to the author or posted as a comment below.

Original Article

Hope you enjoyed reading this article.
Please feel free to share!

background-beam

Therapeutic Journal – Journey to knowing yourself

Therapeutic journal is aimed at helping you, the writer, to understand yourself better. It can take you on a journey where you discover the ‘real’ you. It can help you to start understand how your think. It can help you learn to feel your emotions. It can help you unpick your problems. Through your therapeutic journey you can learn how to tackle your issues head-one.

If you keep your journal private, you will feel safe and this will help write honestly and with passion.

It is all about YOU

When I mention journal writing, some of my clients automatically think of a diary where you record your day. This is not what it is about. It is NOT a record. A therapeutic journal is about ‘you’. You are the centre of attention. You only record your feelings, thoughts and ideas. You will reflect on what affects you, and look at ways that you can change things. It will help you gain a clearer sense of yourself, and the direction you want your life to take. You will aim to improve your understanding of yourself. You will learn to become your own best friend.

Honesty is the best policy

For the therapeutic journal to work, you need to be honest with yourself.  You need to be prepared to allow those deep feelings (which you usually ignore) to be written about. You may find, at times, that it is painful and you find yourself challenging yourself. That is ok. You will only benefit from writing regularly if you allow yourself to look at your inner self.

1. Self-awareness – Therapeutic journal will increase your self-awareness. You will get to know yourself and understand yourself better.

2. Notice patterns – Through writing regularly every day you may notice patterns that you are repeating. You can identify the problems you are facing and tackle them head on, often by searching for solutions. If you write about your destructive behaviour patterns, you are able to notice patterns and stop or change them. You can reflect on ways to break the habit of self-destruction.

3. Treat yourself and others with care – Writing will help you become your best friend. Often people who struggle with their self-esteem or loving themselves will notice the difference in how they treat themselves when they start writing therapeutically. This in turn helps them improve their communication with others, as well deepen relationships. As they improve their communication with others and are able to relate to more people with empathy.

4. Notice change – If you write regularly and for a long time, you will start to notice how things have changed for you. You can identify what has helped you in the past, and pull in on your own resources to tackle problems when you are faced with them. This will help you identify what works well for you. You can then put this into action and create more of it.

Fear of journaling

When I mention to clients about therapeutic journal. The common statements are ‘I have nothing to write about’ or ‘I don’t know where to start’.

The best way to start a therapeutic journal is ‘At the moment, I am feeling…….’. This will usually lead you to keep writing. However, if you are then stuck then ask yourself ‘what is going on for me at this moment? You can then reflect on how you feel stuck or not knowing where to start.

If neither of these work then just free write what is on your mind. Do not worry about your grammar or English, just write. If you are stuck. Write ‘I am stuck’ and keep writing ‘I am stuck’. Believe me, after you have written that 10 times you will start writing something else.

Useful questions to ask yourself in your journal are:

  • What do I feel right now?
  • What is really going on for me right now?
  • What is working for me and what is not working for me?
  • What areas of my life would I change?
  • What areas of my life would I want to improve?
  • Write down any patterns or habits you know you do?
  • What are the positives in my life?

Keep it regular

A good way to start is to limit your time to 10 minutes each day. This will help you get some momentum and allow you ‘free write’. By writing every day, you are able to release your feelings and stand back from your thoughts.  You begin to know yourself better and look at areas that you can improve and build upon.

If you struggle to write every day. That is ok. This journal is to help you. It is not to be a chore. You can dip in and out of it when time allows or write just on weekdays. If you are writing as part of therapy then it is good to find some routine to when you write.

Don’t forget to write about your positives too, and acknowledge the things you like about yourself. Do look back at what you write. This allows you to review what you have written, and enable you to reflect on your journey. It also helps you see how far you have come.

What is stopping you now from writing? Go on, give it a go.

Hazel Hill is a BACP Accredited counsellor and supervisor with over 20 years experience. She provides face to face counselling, as well as walk talk therapy in Sheffield to individual and couples. She also provides online counselling for aid workers and road traffic trauma. Hazel, as a qualified supervisor, also helps trainee counsellors, and supervisees applying for Accreditation. You can ring her on 07814 363855 to book an appointment now.

Counselling near Burnley

Counselling near Barnsley

Looking for counselling near Barnsley for yourself or someone else? We can help!

Sometimes it is comforting to know that the therapy you receive has the anonymity you seek, where you feel safe and confident to open up to yourself knowing, when, at the end of your session, you aren’t walking out to a street where everybody knows your name.

Connect With A Qualified Counsellor Supporting Barnsley Area!

Counselling near Barnsley

If difficulties from the past, painful experiences in the present or worries about the future leave you feeling distressed or struggling to face day to day life then Counselling with Gareth Parry can provide an opportunity to share, evaluate and challenge your issues in a safe, confidential and non-judgmental space.

Counselling near Barnsley

With an abundant experience with a diverse client base, spanning age, gender, cultural, religious and lifestyle type and enjoy working with all.

Your First Session!

Your first session is a free two-way assessment, both you and your Counsellor therapist Gareth will establish if you are able to work together. Gareth will appreciate that you may have intense feelings about attending therapy and will work to help you feel at ease. Asking non intrusive questions but gaining an understanding of your issue and what you want to gain from attending Counselling. Gareth will discuss his therapeutic approach, session times, payment, confidentiality, and the cancellation policy with you so you have a clear understanding of the way it works.

Therapy Can Be Provided For Many Types

Counselling near Barnsley
Counselling near Barnsley Call Gareth Parry on: 07770 635 046

Gareth Parry


 


 

Councelling near Barnsley

Counselling near Burnley

Counselling near Burnley

Looking for counselling near Burnley for yourself or someone else? We can help!

Sometimes it is comforting to know that the therapy you receive has the anonymity you seek, where you feel safe and confident to open up to yourself knowing, when, at the end of your session, you aren’t walking out to a street where everybody knows your name.

Connect With A Qualified Counsellor Supporting Burnley Area!

Counselling near Burnley

If difficulties from the past, painful experiences in the present or worries about the future leave you feeling distressed or struggling to face day to day life then Counselling with Gareth Parry can provide an opportunity to share, evaluate and challenge your issues in a safe, confidential and non-judgmental space.

Counselling near Burnley

With an abundant experience with a diverse client base, spanning age, gender, cultural, religious and lifestyle type and enjoy working with all.

Your First Session!

Your first session is a free two-way assessment, both you and your Counsellor therapist Gareth will establish if you are able to work together. Gareth will appreciate that you may have intense feelings about attending therapy and will work to help you feel at ease. Asking non intrusive questions but gaining an understanding of your issue and what you want to gain from attending Counselling. Gareth will discuss his therapeutic approach, session times, payment, confidentiality, and the cancellation policy with you so you have a clear understanding of the way it works.

Therapy Can Be Provided For Many Types

Counselling near Burnley
Counselling near Burnley Call Gareth Parry on: 07770 635 046

Gareth Parry


 


 

Councelling near Burnley

Counselling near Blackburn

Counselling near Blackburn

Looking for counselling near Blackburn for yourself or someone else? We can help!

Sometimes it is comforting to know that the therapy you receive has the anonymity you seek, where you feel safe and confident to open up to yourself knowing, when, at the end of your session, you aren’t walking out to a street where everybody knows your name.

Connect With A Qualified Counsellor Supporting Blackburn Area!

Counselling near Blackburn

If difficulties from the past, painful experiences in the present or worries about the future leave you feeling distressed or struggling to face day to day life then Counselling with Gareth Parry can provide an opportunity to share, evaluate and challenge your issues in a safe, confidential and non-judgmental space.

Counselling near Blackburn

With an abundant experience with a diverse client base, spanning age, gender, cultural, religious and lifestyle type and enjoy working with all.

Your First Session!

Your first session is a free two-way assessment, both you and your Counsellor therapist Gareth will establish if you are able to work together. Gareth will appreciate that you may have intense feelings about attending therapy and will work to help you feel at ease. Asking non intrusive questions but gaining an understanding of your issue and what you want to gain from attending Counselling. Gareth will discuss his therapeutic approach, session times, payment, confidentiality, and the cancellation policy with you so you have a clear understanding of the way it works.

Therapy Can Be Provided For Many Types

Counselling near Blackburn
Counselling near Blackburn Call Gareth Parry on: 07770 635 046

Gareth Parry


 


 

Councelling near Blackburn

Counselling near Rochdale

Counselling near Rochdale

Looking for counselling near Rochdale for yourself or someone else? We can help!

Sometimes it is comforting to know that the therapy you receive has the anonymity you seek, where you feel safe and confident to open up to yourself knowing, when, at the end of your session, you aren’t walking out to a street where everybody knows your name.

Connect With A Qualified Counsellor Supporting Rochdale Area!

Counselling near Rochdale

If difficulties from the past, painful experiences in the present or worries about the future leave you feeling distressed or struggling to face day to day life then Counselling with Gareth Parry can provide an opportunity to share, evaluate and challenge your issues in a safe, confidential and non-judgmental space.

Counselling near Rochdale

With an abundant experience with a diverse client base, spanning age, gender, cultural, religious and lifestyle type and enjoy working with all.

Your First Session!

Your first session is a free two-way assessment, both you and your Counsellor therapist Gareth will establish if you are able to work together. Gareth will appreciate that you may have intense feelings about attending therapy and will work to help you feel at ease. Asking non intrusive questions but gaining an understanding of your issue and what you want to gain from attending Counselling. Gareth will discuss his therapeutic approach, session times, payment, confidentiality, and the cancellation policy with you so you have a clear understanding of the way it works.

Therapy Can Be Provided For Many Types

Counselling near Rochdale
Counselling near Rochdale Call Gareth Parry on: 07770 635 046

Gareth Parry


 


 

Councelling near Rochdale

Counselling near Ilkley

Counselling near Ilkley

Looking for counselling near Ilkley for yourself or someone else? We can help!

Sometimes it is comforting to know that the therapy you receive has the anonymity you seek, where you feel safe and confident to open up to yourself knowing, when, at the end of your session, you aren’t walking out to a street where everybody knows your name.

Connect With A Qualified Counsellor Supporting Ilkley Area!

Counselling near Ilkley

If difficulties from the past, painful experiences in the present or worries about the future leave you feeling distressed or struggling to face day to day life then Counselling with Gareth Parry can provide an opportunity to share, evaluate and challenge your issues in a safe, confidential and non-judgmental space.

Counselling near Ilkley

With an abundant experience with a diverse client base, spanning age, gender, cultural, religious and lifestyle type and enjoy working with all.

Your First Session!

Your first session is a free two-way assessment, both you and your Counsellor therapist Gareth will establish if you are able to work together. Gareth will appreciate that you may have intense feelings about attending therapy and will work to help you feel at ease. Asking non intrusive questions but gaining an understanding of your issue and what you want to gain from attending Counselling. Gareth will discuss his therapeutic approach, session times, payment, confidentiality, and the cancellation policy with you so you have a clear understanding of the way it works.

Therapy Can Be Provided For Many Types

Counselling near Ilkley
Counselling near Ilkley Call Gareth Parry on: 07770 635 046

Gareth Parry


 


 

Councelling near Ilkley

Counselling near Bolton

Counselling near Bolton

Looking for counselling near Bolton for yourself or someone else? We can help!

Sometimes it is comforting to know that the therapy you receive has the anonymity you seek, where you feel safe and confident to open up to yourself knowing, when, at the end of your session, you aren’t walking out to a street where everybody knows your name.

Connect With A Qualified Counsellor Supporting Bolton Area!

Counselling near Bolton

If difficulties from the past, painful experiences in the present or worries about the future leave you feeling distressed or struggling to face day to day life then Counselling with Gareth Parry can provide an opportunity to share, evaluate and challenge your issues in a safe, confidential and non-judgmental space.

Counselling near Bolton

With an abundant experience with a diverse client base, spanning age, gender, cultural, religious and lifestyle type and enjoy working with all.

Your First Session!

Your first session is a free two-way assessment, both you and your Counsellor therapist Gareth will establish if you are able to work together. Gareth will appreciate that you may have intense feelings about attending therapy and will work to help you feel at ease. Asking non intrusive questions but gaining an understanding of your issue and what you want to gain from attending Counselling. Gareth will discuss his therapeutic approach, session times, payment, confidentiality, and the cancellation policy with you so you have a clear understanding of the way it works.

Therapy Can Be Provided For Many Types

Counselling near Bolton
Counselling near Bolton Call Gareth Parry on: 07770 635 046

Gareth Parry


 


 

Councelling near Bolton